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Digg Returns :Google apologizes for accidentally de-indexing Digg

Digg – a website which helps users find and share great content on the web is now back in the search results after Google mistakenly de-indexed them. Google has now apologised for Digg’s de-indexing, saying it “inadvertently” applied a webspam action to whole site while trying to deal with a spammer.

Google’s Spam champ, Matt Cutts gives State of Search the exclusive on what went down.

[quote cite="John Doe"]“We were tackling a spammer and inadvertently took action on the root page of digg.com.”

“We’ll be looking into what protections or process improvements would make this less likely to happen in the future.”

He continues to say:

“We’re sorry about the inconvenience this morning to people trying to search for Digg. In the process of removing a spammy link on Digg.com, we inadvertently applied the webspam action to the whole site. We’re correcting this, and the fix should be deployed shortly.”[/quote][columns-container]

Google has also confirmed that the incident had nothing to do with the announcement made by Digg regarding them dropping Google reader for their owner development after Google threaten to kill it off this coming July.  It’s obvious that Google is aware about Digg’s duplicate content module and seems to be fine with it. Google’s actions has put some speculations to rest but at the same time revived my curiosity around duplicate content and algorithm penalties.

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  1. [...] So what happens when just hours later Google apologises for ‘inadvertently’ de-indexing Digg.com? [...]

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